The Last Ride

Large Animal Removal and Disposal

By

Keeping Your Horse Healthy This Summer Part 3: Adjusting Schedules

Heat stress is a concern for horses that are older, out of shape or obese. Young foals can also experience heat stress due to hydration. To avoid heat stress, it is a good idea to make some adjustments to your schedule while also being continually aware of your horse’s condition. 

Making Adjustments

Read More

By

Keeping Your Horse Healthy This Summer Part 2: Providing Water

Perhaps the simplest and most important step you can take to keep your horse healthy during the summer is to ensure you are providing free and easy access to clean water throughout the day. But how much water is enough and how do you keep it clean?

How Much Water Should I Provide?

Read More

By

Keeping Your Horse Healthy This Summer Part 1: Understanding the Issue

With the warmer summer months just around the corner, it is a good time to look at ways to keep your horse cool and safe from heat-related illnesses. In this three-part series, we will look at simple steps you can take this summer to keep your horse healthy.

Read More

By

Tracking Your Horse’s Vitals for Good Health

As a horse owner, it is important for you to know some basics about horse health and how to recognize when problems arise. Of course, in order to know if something is wrong, you need to know what things look like when they are right.

Read More

By

Guide to Basic Horse Equipment and Care

If you plan to purchase a horse, there are several items that you will want to be sure to purchase in order to properly care for your equine friend. Here are some of the items you will need:

Read More

By

Basic Guidelines to Feeding Your Horse

As a first time horse owner, you may feel a bit apprehensive about feeding your horse. While you may have to do a bit of experimentation to find that combination of feed for your horse, there are a few general rules that you should keep in mind when determining how much to feed.

Read More

By

Cleaning Your Horse’s Stall Part 3: The Deep Clean

Even with regular maintenance of your stall, an occasional deep cleaning may be necessary. This will help to ensure your horse’s stall is free from potential insects, fungus, molds or other issues that may have developed beneath the top bedding layers that you did not notice. 

Read More

By

Cleaning Your Horse’s Stall Part 2: The Cleaning Process

Once you, your equipment and the stall have all been properly prepared for cleaning, you can actually begin the cleaning process. 

The process you use to clean your stall will be slightly different depending upon the bedding that you have in your stall. For example, if your stall is bedded with straw, you will want to use the pitchfork to remove any soiled bedding. If you have sawdust or shavings, on the other hand, you will use a shavings fork to remove the waste. If the bedding is particularly damp or soiled, it may be easier to use a shovel to pick it up and place in in the wheelbarrow. 

Read More

By

Cleaning Your Horse’s Stall Part 1: Getting Prepared

As a horse owner, you will need to clean your horse’s stall on a regular basis. Failure to do so will result in unwanted insects and pests while also putting your horse at risk of developing hoof and breathing problems. Therefore, you should expect to take about 20 minutes each day to give your horse’s stall a quick cleaning. Some of the tools you will need for the task include:

Read More

By

Tips for Building the Ideal Horse Stable

When building a stall for your horse, you need to take several factors into consideration. First, you need to be sure there is enough room in the stall for your horse to lie down comfortably. This means the stall should measure at least 4 to 5 feet wide, 8 feet long and 8 feet tall. Be sure to also consider the width of the manger that will be installed in the stall when determining the overall size of the space. 

In terms of flooring, concrete is the most common option because it is easy to hose down and disinfect. If you have sandy soil, however, you may not choose to lay down a solid floor. This type of flooring is easier on the horse’s legs, but can be more difficult to clean and may require periodically digging out and replacing dirt as it becomes too saturated with urine and water. 

Windows should also be incorporated into your design, as they allow for both ventilation and lighting in the barn. Windows should be covered with a grill or mesh so your horses cannot break the glass. In addition, windows that swing open are generally better than sliders, as sliders can get filled with dirt and may start to stick. 

With these basics in mind, you will be well on your way toward designing the ideal stable for your horse!

View Our Services