The Last Ride

Large Animal Removal and Disposal

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Dealing with Eye Issues with Cattle

Many people fail to realize that eye infections and eye cancer can be a serious issue when raising cattle. While cattle are considered to be relatively easy to care for, eye infections and eye cancer can both be very serious conditions that require proper care and treatment.

Eye Infections

Pinkeye is a very serious condition that can affect cattle. If left untreated or if treated too late, it can lead to blindness. Signs of pinkeye including discolored or cloudy eyes, swelling and unusual discharge. You should check your cattle daily for eye infections and you should contact your veterinarian immediately if you see any signs of infection, as early treatment is essential. It should also be noted that pinkeye vaccines are available and should be used if pinkeye is a common issue in the area where you are raising your cattle.

Eye Cancers

Cattle are very prone to eye cancers, especially lighter-skinned breeds such as Hereford. If detected early, however, eye cancers in cattle are usually fairly easy to treat. If left untreated, on the other hand, the cancer can spread rapidly and can become quite costly to treat. The cancer may also be fatal if not properly treated, so be sure to contact your veterinarian if you suspect eye cancer may be an issue for your cattle.

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Keeping Your Cattle Free from Bacterial Infections

While cows are relatively easy to care for in terms of keeping them healthy, there are a few conditions that you need to watch out for to ensure your cows stay healthy. Two such conditions include mastitis and foot rot.


What is Mastitis?

Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary glands that is caused by bacteria. It generally affects cows that have been lactating, but even those that are not lactating can contract mastitis. 

Symptoms of acute mastitis include elevated temperature and the udder becoming hot, hard and swollen. Treatment with antibiotics is crucial in recovering from mastitis. 

Foot Rot

Foot rot is also a bacterial infection, but rather than affecting the mammary glands, it affects the hoof. One or more hooves may be affected by foot rot at the same time, with the first symptom typically being general lameness. Other symptoms may include odor, swelling and pus or discharge 

You can greatly minimize the risk of foot root by providing proper hoof care and by maintaining all of the cow’s living areas. This includes keeping your cattle off of muddy pastures as well as rough walking surfaces, as these surfaces can injure the hoof. You should contact your veterinarian immediately if hoof rot is suspected.

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How to Prevent Bloat in Cattle

Caring for cows is relatively easy, but there are a few health problems from which cows can suffer. One of the most common of these conditions is bloat.

What is Bloat?

Bloat is a serious condition that is usually caused by overeating grain or grazing from a particularly lush pasture. The first obvious sign of bloat is a distension of the area beside the hip bone on the left side of the cow, an area known as the rumen. The cow may also experience labored breathing and may exhibit signs of discomfort, including grinding teeth, kicking, bawling, groaning and salivating profusely. 

How Can I Avoid Bloat?

To avoid bloat, you should acclimate your cows to a new pasture slowly. First, you should bring some of the pasture to them for a few days. Then, turn them out to the new pasture for only a few hours per day during the first week. In most cases, you should be able to set your cows out to pasture fully the following week. You should keep this same advice in mind any time you are starting a new diet with your cows.

If you see any evidence of bloat in your cows, you should consider it to be an emergency situation and you should contact your vet immediately.

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What Should Be Included In Your Horse’s Diet?

Proper feeding of your horse is essential for its good health and long life. Your feeding routine should be consistent while also including all of the following.  

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Three Tips for Stabling a Healthy Horse

If you are stabling your horse, there are a few things that you need to keep in mind in order to ensure your horse stays safe and healthy.

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Creating a Safe Outdoor Living Environment for Your Horse

As a horse owner in Arizona, you have the option to allow your horse to live out year-round. While you will certainly need to provide opportunities for shade during the hot summer months, there are also a few things that you should keep in mind in terms of feeding and grazing.

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The Basics of Horse Grooming

Grooming your horse is not only important for keeping it looking great and feeling healthy, but grooming can also be a great way to spend time and bond with your horse, too. Here are a few basics to keep in mind when grooming your horse. 

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Must-Have Items to Include in Your Horse First-Aid Kit

To help ensure you are prepared for emergencies that may develop with your horse, it is good idea to create a first-aid kit to keep on hand at all times. Here is a look at some of the items that should be included in your kit.

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Horse Tying Basics Every Horse Owner Should Know

As a horse owner, it is important for you to know how to tie your horse. Many are surprised to learn that there are actually three different methods that you can use for tying up a horse. These include using a lead rope, trailer ties or cross ties. Here is a closer look at all three.

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Feeding Your Horse the Proper Diet

In an ideal situation, your horse should have constant access to high-quality forage as the primary part of its diet. This can come in the form of fresh grass or hay. If your horse is allowed to go without constant access to forage, it can develop ulcers as well as other digestive issues. At the same time, it is also important to ensure your horse maintains its proper weight, which means you have to find some way to monitor your horse’s food intake.

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